© 2012 Ursula Burke

Artist Statement

Video Interview

To coincide with the Art of Troubles exhibition at the Ulster Museum 2014, the Museum developed an online archive

which contains further information on the artists featured in the exhibition. I discuss some of the theme in my work: HERE

 

Ursula Burke -Troubles Archive: HERE

Burke's most recent work - A False Dawn, brings together a suite of work that seeks to investigate the experience of insecurity, fast becoming a universal condition as we struggle to subsist in an impoverished and increasingly unstable civil society, in which personal solutions are prescribed to global problems. Whilst her work is born out of a context of contested spaces, identities and borders her work also looks outwards towards Brexit and Trump politics and the global phenomenon of a rise in Populism; posing questions in relation to the success or failure of the political enterprise. The concept for new progressive politics to take shape, with many false dawns is redolent in this body of work.

 

Porcelain and Textile Sculpture

Each imperial dynasty, particularly in roman history, sought to emphasise certain aspects of representation in an effort to legitimise their authority. Using Parian porcelain, famed for emulating the carved marble sculptures from Antiquity, Burke's work adopts visual tropes and surviving fragments of the Classical tradition. Many of the figurative sculptures reveal bruises or wounds on the surface, in an attempt to destabilise conventions around the classical ideal in form. Rather than enshrine the heroic or powerful, they aim to capture the darker side of revolution and conflict, formalising violence caught at a moment in time.

 

Several of the pieces integrate porcelain and textile work, re-appropriating contemporary works such as a Cluny Museum, Paris, tapestry cushion cover, purchased from the gift store and integrated into a piece of sculpture.